Science starts taking gluten seriously and the results surprise no one

Posted on Mon 22 May 2017 in Dispatches • 1 min read

James Hamblin, M.D. with a good piece on gluten research for The Atlantic:

In fact, not only does gluten not cause heart disease in the general population, but people who go gluten-free seem to actually be putting themselves at an increased risk of heart disease, insofar as it means …


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Nine podcasts to help you escape the horror of our dying republic

Posted on Sat 20 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with podcasts, culture, horror, gaming, writing, politics • 5 min read

Let’s face it. Things are bad right now.

Regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum, it’s hard to be happy about anything at the moment, unless you’re, I don’t know, a bridge troll, I guess? You need something to take your mind off things …


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The privacy paradox of the internet

Posted on Sat 20 May 2017 in Dispatches • 1 min read

Great write-up in HBR on the contradiction between stated concerns of privacy and behavioral changes as a result.

Contrary to previous studies, the findings of the meta-analysis revealed that individuals who are more concerned with and informed about privacy tend to use fewer online services, set stronger security settings, and …


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Soaring with Pelican

Posted on Fri 19 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with personal, development, assorted geekery, meta • 3 min read

Pelican logo

Get Pelican: it’s good!

There comes a time in every young man’s life when he begins to neglect his digital lawn, and the weeds grow so thick you wouldn’t think there was any home there at all. Such has been the state of Ministry for the last …


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The View From Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Posted on Fri 30 September 2016 in Dispatches • Tagged with space, quotes • 1 min read

The scientists learned much about the comet’s landscape. Dr. El-Maarry described its surface as very dark — reflecting just 3 to 4 percent of the sunlight that hits it. The darkness comes from a dearth of ice at the surface and an abundance of organic molecules.

Some areas are bare …


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Warren Ellis on Writing

Posted on Tue 03 May 2016 in Dispatches • Tagged with writing, quotes • 1 min read

This is the part of the job that doesn’t get talked about a lot, not least because it’s hard to talk about, but also because it doesn’t involve Productivity and Goals and The Magic Of Writering and The Grand Statement and all that good stuff in interviews …


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M. John Harrison on the next five years in SF publishing

Posted on Wed 27 April 2016 in Dispatches • Tagged with writing, quotes, publishing, scifi, sff • 1 min read

I also suspect that we’ll see less fiction of all kinds. Everyone will have published their novel and discovered they aren’t going to get rich–or even noticed–by writing. The industry, especially in its middleclass form, ie traditional, paper-published litfic, saw peak remuneration in the 1990s and …


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Writing Excuses Shares Newton’s Laws of Writing

Posted on Tue 05 April 2016 in Dispatches • Tagged with writing, quotes • 1 min read

  1. A word count at rest will tend to stay at rest, and a word count in motion will tend to stay in motion.
  2. Word count = Motivation * Focus
  3. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When you write words, they write back. Writing is its own reward.

Howard Taylor, Writing …


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What Are You Doing Now?

Posted on Sun 08 November 2015 in Dispatches • Tagged with personal • 3 min read

It’s easy to forget what’s important to you.

It shouldn’t be. It should be easy to say “no” to the unimportant. It’s counterintuitive that we so easily set aside our priorities in the wake of the new shiny. But we do, and quite often. I’m …


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Quote: Charlie Jane Anders on Sentences for Fiction

Posted on Sun 20 September 2015 in Dispatches • Tagged with writing, quotes • 1 min read

People will advise you to write all sorts of sentences. Snappy sentences, lyrical sentences, Hemingway-esque short sentences, long Faulknerian sentences. But there’s really only one kind of sentence that actually works: a sentence that carries the reader forward from the previous sentence.

Charlie Jane Anders, The Only Kind of …


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