Review of The Night Ocean

Posted on Thu 22 June 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with books, reviews • 2 min read

The Night Ocean

The Night Ocean by Paul La Farge
⭐️️️️⭐️⭐️ / ⭐️️️️⭐️⭐️⭐️️️️⭐️

This is a book where my opinion of it has changed the longer I’ve been away from it. It’s a strange book, and honestly its structure was nearly its undoing for me.

The majority of the book is conducted in a …


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River of Teeth, or why the hippo is my new spirit animal

Posted on Fri 02 June 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with books, reviews • 2 min read

River of Teeth

River of Teeth

In the early 20th Century, the United States government concocted a plan to import hippopotamuses into the marshlands of Louisiana to be bred and slaughtered as an alternative meat source. This is true.

Other true things about hippos: they are savage, they are fast, and their jaws …


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Mandatory HTTPS for everyone

Posted on Thu 25 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with encryption, meta, networking, privacy, security • 2 min read

These days, encryption is more important than ever. You don’t need to look any farther than the national news for reasons why. Even small sites that don’t provide user accounts should consider it. I was reminded of this recently when I came across a post by Jeff Atwood …


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Now supporting JSON feeds and scheduled posts

Posted on Wed 24 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with assorted geekery, development, meta, pelican • 1 min read

I’m happy to report that this site now produces a valid JSON feed for your consumption. If you are using one of the few feedreaders that support them, that is.

JSON Feed logo

JSON Feeds: Slurp ‘em if you’ve got ‘em!

JSON feeds are a relatively new concept in syndication, but …


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How Aikido can change the way you work

Posted on Tue 23 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with aikido, business, conflict, martial arts, self improvement • 9 min read

It’s been close to eleven years since I last wore a gi and was thrown over someone’s hip, but I still practice Aikido every day. Not in a dojo, and not on a practice mat, but in the office and in my home.

What is Aikido?

Aikido, for …


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Science starts taking gluten seriously and the results surprise no one

Posted on Mon 22 May 2017 in Dispatches • 1 min read

James Hamblin, M.D. with a good piece on gluten research for The Atlantic:

In fact, not only does gluten not cause heart disease in the general population, but people who go gluten-free seem to actually be putting themselves at an increased risk of heart disease, insofar as it means …


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Nine podcasts to help you escape the horror of our dying republic

Posted on Sat 20 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with culture, gaming, horror, podcasts, politics, writing • 5 min read

Let’s face it. Things are bad right now.

Regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum, it’s hard to be happy about anything at the moment, unless you’re, I don’t know, a bridge troll, I guess? You need something to take your mind off things …


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The privacy paradox of the internet

Posted on Sat 20 May 2017 in Dispatches • 1 min read

Great write-up in HBR on the contradiction between stated concerns of privacy and behavioral changes as a result.

Contrary to previous studies, the findings of the meta-analysis revealed that individuals who are more concerned with and informed about privacy tend to use fewer online services, set stronger security settings, and …


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Soaring with Pelican

Posted on Fri 19 May 2017 in Dispatches • Tagged with assorted geekery, development, meta, pelican, personal, python • 3 min read

Pelican logo

Get Pelican: it’s good!

There comes a time in every young man’s life when he begins to neglect his digital lawn, and the weeds grow so thick you wouldn’t think there was any home there at all. Such has been the state of Ministry for the last …


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The View From Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Posted on Fri 30 September 2016 in Dispatches • Tagged with quotes, space • 1 min read

The scientists learned much about the comet’s landscape. Dr. El-Maarry described its surface as very dark — reflecting just 3 to 4 percent of the sunlight that hits it. The darkness comes from a dearth of ice at the surface and an abundance of organic molecules.

Some areas are bare …


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