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The privacy paradox of the internet

·121 words·1 min
Daniel Andrlik
Author
Daniel Andrlik
Daniel Andrlik lives in the suburbs of Philadelphia. By day he manages product teams. The rest of the time he is a podcast host and producer, writer of speculative fiction, a rabid reader, and a programmer.

Great write-up in HBR on the contradiction between stated concerns of privacy and behavioral changes as a result.

Contrary to previous studies, the findings of the meta-analysis revealed that individuals who are more concerned with and informed about privacy tend to use fewer online services, set stronger security settings, and disclose less personal information. However, when it comes to social media use, there is indeed a privacy paradox, as even individuals who express concerns behave quite carelessly, engaging in uncensored or inappropriate self-disclosure, making a great deal of their digital footprint public, and allowing a wide range of external apps to access their data.

Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Nathalie Nahai, Why We’re So Hypocritical About Online Privacy

Well worth a read.

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