Skip to main content
  1. Dispatches/

Writing Report Card: November 2017

·122 words·1 min
Articles Writing Submissions Report Card Publishing
Daniel Andrlik
Author
Daniel Andrlik
Daniel Andrlik lives in the suburbs of Philadelphia. By day he manages product teams. The rest of the time he is a podcast host and producer, writer of speculative fiction, a rabid reader, and a programmer.

Last month, I announced a new recurring feature where I’ll publicly post a report card of fiction writing activity each month. This series is inspired by Aeryn Rudel’s blog Rejectomancy. Each month I’ll post my results, summarizing words written, submissions, rejections, and hopefully acceptances.

Here’s the stats for this month:

Words Written>

Words Written #

ProjectTypeWords Written
DARK CONDUITNovel12,542
Market Activity>

Market Activity #

TypeCount
Submissions4
Rejections2
Acceptances0
Publications0

Way less words than I hoped to achieve this month, in part due to a lot of business travel, illness, and honestly a general malaise about the state of the nation. However, I’m ready to buckle down next month for a big push.

Onward!

Related

Writing Report Card: October 2017
·246 words·2 mins
Articles Writing Submissions Report Card Publishing
I’ve been writing a lot more lately, shifting my work from a secret passion to more of a serious pursuit. The last few months I’ve been making steady progress on project DARK CONDUIT, and producing short stories which I’ve been submitting to fiction markets.
Writing Report Card: December 2017
·179 words·1 min
Articles Writing Submissions Report Card Publishing
Continuing my recurring feature where I publicly post a report card of fiction writing activity each month. This series is inspired by Aeryn Rudel’s blog Rejectomancy. Each month I’ll post a report card summarizing words written, submissions, rejections, and hopefully acceptances.
M. John Harrison on the next five years in SF publishing
·119 words·1 min
Articles Writing Publishing Scifi Sff
I also suspect that we’ll see less fiction of all kinds. Everyone will have published their novel and discovered they aren’t going to get rich–or even noticed–by writing. The industry, especially in its middleclass form, ie traditional, paper-published litfic, saw peak remuneration in the 1990s and peak social status dividends in the first ten years of the new century.